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to be for years and years that the government gave money to the banks in the form of guarantees, we would guarantee 90% of the bank loan that the banks made to the students. set ago is side the reserve in case the money didn't get repaid. it turned out the price of the loans went down and the default rate went down once you made the rates down, people could afford to pay it. we started letting the students to pay it at fixed percentage of north carolina. nobody had to drop out of school because they borrowed money. [cheering and applause] what the president did because he knew we needed more people to get college degrees the cost of college was killing people. we dropped from zenned in the world to 16th. the percentage of the people graduated from college until we are almost first in a percentage that go. it's because the cost and people thinking that can never pay it back. it's a big deal. what happened when president obama and the congress adopted the so-called direct student loan program and allowed students to pay that money back at the fixed percent of their income for twenty years.
, recognized by both political parties as turning point. a change debate about the role of government, free market to the future trajectory of our nation. in that debate, campaign commercials and political rhetoric abound. sound bytes, daily reactions dominate the news cycle. luckily for us in the miss -- mist of this a serious thinker wrote a serious book. having been discovered by william f. buckley and grown up writing and reading for national review and overcome the education at harvard university and the upbringing in west virginia, he it a touring figure of the conservative movement. rightly sew. a professor of government the the clare month college. he's the coed or it with william f. buckley of keeping the tablet of modern american conservative thought. he is written extensively on american constitutionalism and political ideas. indeed the addition nat federalist paper the one published -- is the best selling edition in the united states. he can contributes regularly to the opinion pages of the "the wall street journal," "los angeles times," writes about flicks, and -- politicking a
good luck. god bless. [applause] . . the turning point. a change debate. the role of government, free-market, future trajectory of our nation. in that debate to campaign commercials and political rhetoric abound. sound bites, the reactions dominate the news cycle. luckily for us in the midst of all of this a very serious thinker has written a very serious book. having overcome his education at harvard university and his upbringing in west virginia, today a towering figure of the conservative movement wrigley so . professor of government at claremont college. the kill editor with william f. buckley of keeping the tablet, modern american conservative thought. political ideas. indeed, his edition of the federalist papers published by segment is the best selling edition in the ad states. he contributes regularly to the opinion pages of the wall street journal, los angeles times, writes politics and policy review, national review, weekly standard among other journals. a senior fellow at the claremont institute, one of our closest thing tank allies which takes as its mission to restor
something else for us which is to go to checklist of questions to do with for instance, government strategies, the presidential succession and so. so i'm going to deal with that first. one of the facts about algeria that is always to be borne in mind is that, of course, is an oligarchy, which means that it's the political problem of voucher is quite unlike tunisia around ben ali or egypt under a site. at an underbelly -- oligarchy which gives it a great deal of flex builder which gives it a range determined by the oligarchies own repertoire. i want to put the word repertoire after because i think the crucial problem of algeria, the absence of disciple change arises out of the limitations of the repertoires of the regime and of the opposition. i'm going to focus on the opposition in a moment. government strategy has been a sophisticated strategy involving at least five different elements. it's done a lot of flying off of discontent since the rights of january 2011. quite spectacular pay rises, virtually everybody demanded him and everybody did demand them. is allocated a lot of mone
that we cannot afford to sacrifice accuracy to speed and of course our government is sparing no effort tracking down the terrorists who perpetrated this attack. and we are focused as we must on what needs to be done to protect our people and our facilities. we had another terrible attack yesterday. i strongly condemn the killing of a long time yemeni employee at our embassy. we are working with yemeni authorities to investigate this and bring those responsible to justice as well but throughout all of this we must not only focus on the headlines. we have to keep in mind the trend lines and remain focused on the broader strategic question posed by democratic transitions and their impact on american interests and values. let me start by stating the obvious. nobody should have ever thought this would be an easy road. i certainly didn't. however, it is important to look at the full picture, to wave of violent acts of a small number of extremists against the aspirations and actions of the region's people and government. that broader view supports rather than discredits the promise of the ara
a number of years in the spanish government from 1977 to 82. he was an active participant in the negotiations for spanish entry to what is now the european union, the european economic community. he also participated in a number of spanish negotiation then they got, not wto and with the european union and spain a century into the union after democracy was restored in spain and spain was welcomed into the european community process. in the last year at this government coming was minister of the presidency, played a very essential role in the entire spanish government situation. shortly after he joined banco santander and has now been there for over 20 years. he is now vice-chairman of the bank, member of the board, also member of the board of banesto, banco santander in portugal, a member of the board of a number of other financial companies in the group and is president of the print of the foundation and spain. i think we are uniquely privileged data to have a speaker from banco santander with its unique ability to see both the spanish situation, the overall banking situat
it into english and went along the lines of its against the hagues of the government which is you blame every single mistake and work against the state. on the other hand, i mentioned henry david who was pivotal in my thinking. he basically had the idea of not the idea of living but he went out on civil disobedience to the hill and saw this absolute duty that surrounded him. i want to look around myself and say here there is no state. i try to do that every day by making sure i can see everything from interacting with my neighbors in the sense of exchange and privatizing my life, taking my life back from the state and privatizing it to the extent possible do i interject in the state and make sure you go into businesses that are privatizing government services. we are going to an unprecedented period of the state control and i'm not saying that you should marker yourself or your family. that would be reckless. to the extent possible privatize your own personal life. >> does that mean you are living off the grid and not flying on their plans because of tsa and all the different regulations. are
enduring presence will be, and we're working on that right now both internal to our government, but also with our nato allies. so we're trying to determine based on the agreements made in lisbon and then reinforced in chicago about what this long-term commitment will be, and it's scoped against several missions, one of which is counterterror, another of which is continuing to train and advise at some level. another is to enable other agencies of government to do their job in afghanistan. and so as we determine how to, what we'll need to accomplish those missions based on the growth of the afghan security forces, sometime early in 2013 we'll come up with a number that will define our enduring presence. and then we'll take what we have there now, which is 68,000 u.s. and about 30, 34,000 coalition partners, and we'll establish a glide slope to get from where we are to where we're going to be. and the important point is that in that question is i want to reinforce that our objectives remain both sound and achievable. as for the insider threat, as i mentioned in my prepared remarks, the insi
. and of course our government is sparing no effort in tracking down the terrorists who perpetrated this attack. and we are focused, as we must, on what more needs to be done right now to protect our people and our facilities. we had another terrible attack yesterday. i strongly condemn the killing of a long time yemeni employees at our embassy in sanaa and we are working with yemeni authorities to investigate this attack and to bring those responsible to justice as well. but throughout all of this, we must not only focus on the headlines, we have to keep in mind the trend lines. we have to remain focused on the broader strategic question posed by these democratic transitions and their impact on american interests and values. let me start by stating the obvious. nobody should have ever thought this would be an easy road. i certainly didn't. however, it is important to look at the full picture, to weigh the violent acts of a small number of extremists against the aspirations and actions of the region's people and government. that broader view supports, rather than discredits, the promise of the
of city government. i was chairing an elected commission in los angeles to revise the city charter, and i saw then that he not only was amazingly talented, but a reporter of enormous integrity. at one point he believed the los angeles times was not devoting nearly enough time to charter reform, it was important to the city, and according to los angeles weekly, he quit his position at the los angeles times in protest over this. he put his very job on the line because he believed in the importance of the story. he was then and is now an enormous star of the los angeles times. and as a result of that, the los angeles times decided to change it approach and gave tremendous attention to charter reform. i will always believe that charter reform succeeded in 1999 in los angeles because of what jim newton did and the covers of the l.a. times. a few years ago he mentioned to me he was planning to take some time off to do a biography of earl warren. i thought it was a great idea. and then i had the chance to read the book, and without a doubt it's the best judicial biography that i've ever read. so
hollywood, big government, big journalism, and big peace, p, e, a, c, e. he became a big player what is come to be called the new media including work as editor on "the drudge report" website and yes the "huffington post". bull buckley didn't dwell in the past but he believed we should and could learn from it. he was fascinated by the rise of the new media and encouraged conservatives to become involved in it as he had in the old media. he didn't live to see it come to full fruition and andrew left us too soon for him to become a greater influence than he already has. a tribute to him that his web sites and work endure. it is my pleasure as the winner of last year's william f. buckley, jr., award to present this year's award posthumously to andrew breitbart. may he rest in peace. [applause] may he rest in peace and may his legacy live on. accepting the award is oars son dean, susie's father and with him is alley mills dean. ♪ . >> thank you. thank you very much. thank you. thank you. you may remember me. i formally went on the screen, under the name of irene dunne. at my age i have some fr
with the afghan government, which will keep american soldiers in afghanistan until 2024. do you have a sense of what the minimum number of soldiers should be going forward? >> let me clarify a couple of things. there are more than a few former administration folks here who will say that was not the total point man on afghanistan. i was involved, but share the credit with many, many others who probably had more input than i did. the first point i'd like to make about afghanistan and the big difference between a strong and mr. obama is that mr. obama set a deadline, creed, full stop. i was in kabul december 2009 when mr. obama made that speech. and i was talking to isaf people, the people from international force, you know, people who are out there getting shot at from other countries, not just our own. to a man and a woman, there were a lot of women there, they all, almost took no notice of the surge statement. what they noticed was the deadline. what our pakistani friends have noticed is the deadline. what the taliban has noted is the deadline. and everybody is playing to that deadline. incl
at the washington post before i escaped the belt way with my florida girl. government is not a new topic for me. i did not think i could have written this book if i still lived in washington. the group think is too strong and it is almost impossible to overstate the power of the conventional wisdom that the stimulus was a ludicrous failure and totally uncool to talk about it without ruling rise and making ironic comments. you totally stimulated the economy when you gave that panhandler at a dollar. even obama joked after his annual thanksgiving pardon that he saved or created four turkeys. my friends here know that i have a contrarian streak. i don't do groupthink. the guy who visited gulf after the bp spill and rode the environmental damage was being overstated, i was right. i had data. arguing that the stimulus was a new new deal was not just considered contrarian but delusional. like arguing the bp spill didn't happen. we can discuss why. a combination of relentless republican distortion, incompetent white house communication, brain dead media coverage, the unfortunate timing of the jobs bill t
make it seem as though that when you talk about limits on the national government, that's antithetical to the constitution, the existence of a national government. it's embeddedded in the original argument. it argument was about limits. it wasn't about -- you hear this kind of and all these people trying to push us back to the article. that's ludicrous. and that's -- but helped to develop the constitution. .. the same time you understand there are some people still fighting the debate that engage in that debate and subsequent to that even in the adoption of 13th and 14th and 15th amendments you still have so we are still talking about what are the amendments of the national guard? what is the role of the national government, how we protect individual rights and liberties etc.. >> what's move forward and start talking about the events that press the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments. i want our audience, everybody on c-span it isn't just -- it is a special anniversary, it isn't just a to enter the 25th anniversary of the year that changes everything in human history, we the people. it's al
said about taxes, he described a tax cut as the government writing people a check. i hope you don't want, i just want to explain it for him. this is how it works. when people earn money, it's their money, not the governments money. it's their money. [applause] >> don't interrupt. i don't want to lose the thread. [laughter] >> than the government takes some of it away in tax. so if we cut taxes, we are not giving the money. we're taking less of it away, okay? got it? [applause] >> and do you know what? while we are on a, who suffers when a wealthy businessman or operator moves to geneva? not him. it's those who want to work because the jobs come the investment, the growth will go somewhere else. [applause] we promised that those with the broadest shoulders would bear the biggest burden, and with as the rich will pay a greater share of tax in every year of this parliament. and in any one of the 30 years under labour, under labour. [applause] we haven't forgotten what it was like under labour. we remember who spent our golden legacy, who sold our goal from who busted our banks, who s
with president obama's health plan, that it wasn't strong enough or that it's government takeover of health care, you can disdegree with him on taxes or whatever, but this is against him personally and trying to destroy and discredit him personally. the obama hate machine. and it's not just fox news. it's out there because of a couple of people that most americans have never heard of, the famous koch brothers, charles -- now-famous, charles and david coke. david koch. and, again, we've seen corporate-sponsored attacks against presidents before, particularly, and i outline two of them, franklin delano roosevelt. by the way, with him it was the dupont brothers, and there were free of those at the -- three of those at the time. formed the liberty league to deny fdr a second term. and then with bill clinton, of course; was richard melon safe who funded all the investigations that led to paula jones and on and on, and the articles in the american spectator. but nothing compared to the money and the organization that we've seen on the part of charles and david koch who are the heads of koch industries
this can happen if the make of government on november 7 is the same as it is today? >> no. i think will happen for another reason. i think first of all when people figure out there's a big chunk of change, and second of all when you have the debate between the people trying to protect entitlement, and the people trying to kill energy, who are you betting on? >> in california they're saying just allow the winter fuel blend is not early is going to save, make as much as 50 cents a gallon, they've been paying over $5 a gallon in california, and california has created -- [inaudible] >> california is america if we don't change. that's a scary thought. you can see the future, just look to california. it should scare everybody in america. no one would want to go the. part of the answer of california is to stop trying to be the federal government. they can save a lot of money if they pull back from the own agencies and own regulations. but i do think we have this opportunity, to tom's point on this leg of the school got it all fits on a growth like if you will. because i think that we woul
. withstand back in place, struck down by the states in 1997 but the federal government, mandated by federal law, we already had two early decisions from district courts involving private plaintiffs or for profit plaintiffs and the issue to address the merits, there were procedural issues because of ongoing regulatory process that might create a sort of interim step in terms of going up and down the court but that actually is going to get resolved between now and august 1st, 2013. the administrative process will be done and the courts will invariably go straight and you will get merit decisions uniformly by the end of next year. >> those that depend on what the administration does and who wins? >> not really. what the administration has put into play is a piece of the problem. and also the constraints they put upon themselves in addressing that limited issue indicates that there is not going to be much if any relief in the offing for people who sued. basically reading of the writing on the wall or the federal register. there is some accommodation that doesn't include relieving the burden and
spending but he also believed the government had a positive role to play. the interstate highway system, which eisenhower -- which was eisenhower's brainchild. [applause] more money was spent on the intraday -- interstate highway system than the new deal from 1839 to 18 to 41 with zero impact on the budget because it was paid for through gasoline taxes. [applause] thethe st. lawrence seaway connecting the great lakes, opening the great lakes to traffic again had been on the drawing board since the administration of theodore roosevelt and eisenhower -- eisenhower took, assumed the presidency in a time of mccarthyism and incredible communist witchhunt. he did it as he did so many things in the background. it was eisenhower orchestrated the army's response in the army mccarthy hearings. i'm not going to get into a contest but that stunk. and when it was over mccarthy had him vanquished but i think it was the desegregation issue perhaps in which eisenhower most often underestimated. president truman had ordered the army to be desegregated in 1950 but the that the army had not complied. 85%
ahead and respond first and then answer the question, what is the worst thing the federal government can do? boswell: tom talks a lot about it and certainty but a lot happens to create that uncertainty and we need to stop those things and get something done. we need and farm bill and energy credit. yes i think we ought to be clear. gives supported the lose tax breaks and i did not because you know, it seems to me like we have been involved in these long, long wars going on and i can imagine what the soldiers feel like. i know what i would feel like coming back from vietnam. now we have to pay for it. that would not be a very good thing and i think that's very bad. >> moderator: how do you respond to that? latham: in the house of representatives we have passed an extension of the current tax loss and i think it's interesting commerce and boswell says that he opposed the bush taxes and he just voted for a budget that extended the bush tax cuts. but, excuse me, please. boswell: the tax is obviously, we need to extend those. you know we have this sequestration which causes rescission and spe
specifically to bring the governments instead of gridlock to the nation's capital? and i think we split ahead of time, and the first response, final response will go to congresswoman sutton. sutton: thanks very much for the question. i think building those relationships is important but it's also not just about reduce it down with, it's who you stand up for. this race is not just about who is free to be the representative from the 16th district it's going to be who is going to be represented in the 15th defeat the 16th district to read my life is standing up for the middle class and those that aspire to it. i stood up to special-interest and politicians who violated the public trust whether democrats or republicans and to protect medicare and social security earnings that endorsement of the committee for social security and medicare. i stood up for the troops and veterans while i reached across the aisle to pass legislation in the stop-loss protection and other things as well because i know that people deserve a government plot on the back but definitely deserve a government on their side and
command of international affairs and his insight in the workings of government and other actors. with these gentlemen we are poised for an illuminating conversation about the world, the future and the revenge of geography. bobbit and david, over to you. >> i think you're probably not supposed to see the serious moderator by but i love this book. it's ridiculous how many yell will post its i've put in it. i'm not just doing it to flatter the teacher because i really like it and i want to try to walk the audience through this or have him what the audience through and i would like to start with a provocative opening comment. you said my reporting of for three decades convinced me we need to recover the sensibility of time and space that has been lost in the information age's when they dash across the continent which allow us to talk a lot of the distinguished columnist tom friedman labeled a flat world. instead level introduced readers to the decidedly unfashionable figures to push up against the notion that geography no longer matters. i want to ask you to start with the basics of
and the democrats. how they essentially tried to bring the federal government's financial house to some kind of order. the answer is they failed. we have a federal government whose financial house is in total disorder, total disarray. it is a historic problem. to try to put it in english, we have a trillion dollars of iou outstanding in the world. the negotiations, they agreed to raise what they call the debt ceiling, so the government can borrow a couple more trillion dollars. we are going to run it run out of that borrowing authority january or february of next year. they're going to have to go back and authorized congress for more trillions of dollars of borrowing. the republicans and lots of people in congress don't want to authorize that. so there is going to be a bloody negotiation, unless they can work a deal. in a sense, this is a book about the past, but it's about the present. it is about where we are going and what the country's future is. if you think about it i would argue that the inability of the government to fix this borrowing debt deficit issue in the book, vice president b
to be a great investment to have our rate of return of 8%. government taxes, about 1/4 of extra income, to get 8% more each year. government taxes of quarter of it at 2% in real terms, that is pretty high relative to the real interest rate that is actually negative. contribution to gdp, saving from doing when it is the efficient captures a substantial -- captures a substantial part of the cost of necessary public investment. and yes, as the economy starts to grow, as the economy gets out of this phase, it will be necessary to find direct revenue means whether it is taxes or fees on the beneficiary or infrastructure to cover the costs. that need not be the priority right now when the economy is so deficient. let's do it right. we don't know what the economy at is going to be the next ten years, but we do now that we are going to be desperately short on public infrastructure for a decade. let's plan a long-term investment program and financing of that program varies with cyclical conditions as those cyclical conditions evolve. second, let's support employers in hiring workers and employees in taki
'll ever need in israel. and yes, we'll export the gas and today we decided the government at the beginning we'll export 50% of the gas i will evaluate this decision after we continue to drill in the water. but we are very lucky. and i think the energy market. also one being in my book is i haven't seen any of this year and 10 u.s., but now doing a pilot on the infrastructure and we try to use their brain for their solutions for energy. >> i am an israeli. i was born there. others raise their. as an israeli now, either argumentative, but this is not the forum for arguments. i am also a guest here. i enlaces gaston we're not supposed to attack, although you tempt me greatly. >> we can do that in israel. >> after my house we can do that. not everybody in israel is in agreement with you. there's many experienced people, smart people, don't hold on to your point of view. i have a very simple question. israel is a mighty country. it is the strongest country in the middle east. israel has a clichÉ of atomic weapons. for many years, they obtained like we used to do historically to obtain arms and
, to demolish or damage government aid programs. many of them designed to help children and the poor. >> the bombing in oakland the city has focused renewed attention on the rhetoric that's been coming from the right and those who cater to angry white men. although no one is suggesting right wing greater jocks approve of violence, the extent to which the approach fosters violence is being questioned by many observers. >> i don't think i think jesse jones defenders here. >> not me. i think you have to be worried about that's what's going on in the good lord's mind, because if there's retributive justice, he will get aids from a transfusion or one of his grandchildren will get it. >> it finally dawned on me that the person can start has reminded me of facially all this time was heinrich himmler, including his glasses. >> this advice, mr. bush, shut the hell up, good night and good luck. >> they have waved signs liking president obama to hitler and the devil can raise questions about whether he was really born in this country, falsely accuse him of planning to set up dead panels -- deat
been starved by an intelligencal government policy over the last ten to fifteen years. it's a place that houses and has housed for well over a decade of serious of -- concentration camps where political prisoners are tortured, sometimes executed for crimes no more serious than listening to a foreign radio broadcast. , reading a bible or disrespecting a picture of the dear leader. it's really a chilling book and it's a book that should be must read for anyone who cares about human rights or who cares about the political environment and the foreign policy concerns that relate to north korea. as a general rule, u.s. north korea policy follows a very similar and repetitive pattern. the provocations by the regime, missile launches, underground nuclear test or the occasional thinking of south korean boat. they are followed by threats of sanction by the international community. a lot of hand wringing. as with the child, the province of better behavior whereupon the international community comes back and provides more aid to the regime. in many respects continuing to prop up the regime. and
in return is by and large good government. and we do find it. we have research and studies that have gone into that. there's also the question of corporate money which was pointed out, everybody but super pacs would be funded by corporate money. that is cloudy not the case. it's almost all individual money. albeit from very wealthy individuals. there's not a strong reason to think is mostly corporate money, especially not large corporate publicly traded corporations. what we have to ultimately is a couple of questions. there's one question, which is is a good or bad habits more open deregulate system where everybody can kind of play the game? the second question is the one kim keeps trying to drag us back to is how much of this do we need more disclosure of this because some of this activity is not disclosed? i will note that 501(c)(4) organizations have always been able to participate in politics and it never had to disclose their donors. i take, sort of my starting point, my perception of the government better have a darn good reason before source keeping a database in which it catalogs
. europe is a mild recession. you could argue not worse, but the government has spent 50% of the money. in asia is slower but nothing mystical or different than the newspapers. the united states is fundamentally stronger than people think much of the reasons for that a little bit later. in latin america, you know, some groups are slower, but obviously a slowdown quite a bit. >> in a show you seem sanguine about peer what about india slowing, china slowing, china slowing, china slowing and they're going they're going to need to check its good remember is to be a lot higher. they need the 7% or 8% to avoid the social unrest and to build the infrastructure. i think they're going to need that. they're going to change the leadership to be smooth and will continue former policies of the government, but they have the wherewithal. so they've got $3 trillion in reserves and capability to maintain. they move very quickly. so the stimulus package after the crisis they think was like seven months after the crisis, they did in fact, literally. so they know what they want to accomplish. i don't beli
. the protection against government sponsorship and promotion of religion, which is a vital component of religious liberty. i will just say a few words about where we are today and where we used to be. they are important right next to each other. as for the separation of church and state, the protection against government sponsorship of religion there was little and today it is far more robust, but absent flows and a lot of that depends on the current competition and chemistry of the supreme court and the rest of the federal court in state courts as well. but a while back there was virtually none. i think there is a great deal more of that protection today. it is very much in jeopardy. on the free exercise side, it is never been particularly robust in this country, unfortunately. and i think it is very fortunate. today it is a mixed bag. in 1990, the supreme court severely limited the constitutional protection for free exercise in the way that i think probably all of us at this table think was wrong. and since then, there have been legislative efforts to correct the problem. what the court said ba
of the government, i don't receive any royalties, so the price has been set very low, and i hope you all enjoy it. [laughter] >> let's talk a little bit about the idea that these machines have proceeded us to mars. is it still, ultimately, the target to put a human being there? >> for sure. and it's sometimes very surprising if you talk -- all of the scientists i spoke to really want to be there. they, they sense that they need to be there in order to do exploration the way it should be done. and part of it has to do with all those limitations that i talked about. they all want to go in different places. we'd accomplish a lot more with six people than six people standing on a skateboard together. and i think your point, though, about anticipating or preparing has become more and more real. i don't think we understood that so well before mer. that we could for reasonable cost put these rovers in different places around mars and figure out where would we want to go, where should we land, where should the human landing be. >> so what's the time limit? >> what's that? >> what's the timeline? >> write
could argue, but the government spends 50 percent of the money. so 50 percent will not go down, but with asia is slower, but nothing mystical or different than you read about newspapers. the united states is fundamentally stronger than people think in my opinion. under the reasons for that. and latin america, good, bad, slow. obviously it is drawing down quite a bit. >> what about india clearly slowing, china clearly slowing. >> here is china. china is, again, an opinion. i think you're going to need to object to seven or 8 percent growth. it used to be a lot higher. they use that to employ a million people to avoid the social unrest. think you're going to need that because you're actually quite right. a change will be smoothed or continue the former policy of the government, but they have the wherewithal to do it. they have $3 trillion in reserves and a lot of capability to maintain growth. they move very quickly. so you may remember, the united states package sent to the crisis. it was like seven months into the crisis stated that month with chile. so they had the ability to
and these are all government documents and they have never been found. so that was one thing he seems to have gotten away with. another thing was in 2004, smart tag played a central role in the presidential election. the secretary of each state, a part of their job is to oversee an impartial election. you may recall kathleen harris in florida was secretary of state of florida and she also haven't played a central role in the bush election and there is considerable controversy over that. well, a very similar thing happened in ohio in 2004, where ken blackwell was secretary of state. and again, he was supposed to oversee a fair and impartial election. but he happened to be cochaired the bush cheney reelection committee. he decided to tabulate the return for the 2004 election was secretary of state's computers weren't enough than they needed to get another set of computer service. so who did he go to both smart tack. smart tax roll raises an amount of very interesting questions. i went through the returns as deeply studied. there were several lawsuits. you can see when the returns came in that night. a
they came from government research grants. we have the department of defense which always wanted us to be at the very cutting edge of technology. we had the internet was originally a way for government scientist to communicate with each other. clearly that basis is sort of the big reason silicon valley got started and we sort of had this critical mass and created the fertile ground and on the job training and kind of the kind of interaction that helped us. >> guest: i would say it's possible. i'm skeptical of it. and skeptical of it for two reasons. when you think about the internet, think about all the commercialization of it that has occurred since 1992 or three when they came up with the browsers. almost all that has been done by private enterprise to very little of it i think was done by the government. and so the second is i don't know about you but when i think back to what i learned in school, all learning occurs on the job. it's highly specialized. and that you really learn by doing over the course of your career very little of which are taking away from school. that's the t
and growth. but it doesn't involve big government and doesn't involve capitalism. when you believe in this kind of system you don't believe in the traditional painters of the left or the right. i felt it was time we had a category to describe these people, so here progressive is what i came up with. >> host: post central authority, posted a decentralized authority. >> the way that the internet was built and the way the web was built, partially the result of visionary government funding which we have heard a lot about since the early days from there was funding that came to the government. the internet was built by loose collaborative networks without any traditional leaders, without any bureaucrats and built by people who were not actually working for big private corporations and free of the building on each other's ideas and refining those ideas and sharing them. this is one of these things if we did in having this conversation 40 years ago you would say that is a lovely utopian idea and it would work well in a commune in california when you are making baskets but this is the way
is if our worst fears about libya were to come to pass. as i mentioned before, the libyan government is very much committed to the road map they've laid out, they're very committed to the political process, but i'd like to bring you back to the middle of 2011. at the time, gadhafi's head of external security defected. and when he defected, he warned that libya would become like somalia. and at the time i think most frames of references were to mogadishu, to a black hawk down moment. and, unfortunately, we have had a black hawk down moment in benghazi. but i think he's, you know, a are nuanced guy. and what i think he was referring to was a much broader frame of reference. how would libya look like somalia. not just a black hawk down incident, not just a benghazi incident, but other dimensions as well. and i think what he meant was probably this: that militia leaders are going to transition into warlords, that some parts of the country are going to fall to islamists akin to somalia, that other parts of the country will be relatively manageable like puntland or somaliland, but they're going to
called it the committee effect is really not committees, it was governments. he'll dealing with the canadian government we're asking them for the pass passport. can you imagine them coming us and asking us for blank bass pass -- passport. no. he's dealing with every level of the white house and jimmy carter who approved -- tony had one foot out of the door in germany and a cable came in that said stop. the president is reviewing the findings. twenty in in the -- twenty minutes later, god speed. good luck. from the president of the united states. this is unprecedented. he said, if this didn't go well, the american flag was going to be draped all over it. so he's working with the canadian and the white house, he's working with the cia, bureaucracy and the state department. it's difficult get everybody on the same page with the idea they're calling the best bad they could come up with. he did all of that. but beyond that, he went and walked them through the airport on his own, which wasn't necessarily in the plan, and our headquarter often tells us don't do that. don't go in t
and growth. but it doesn't necessarily involve a government and doesn't necessarily involve capitalism or big corporation. so when you believe in a system come you don't necessarily believe in the traditional anchors that the left are traditional anchors at the right. so i felt that it is time that we had a category to describe these people come as a pure progressives is what i came up with. >> host: post central authority, post decentralized authority? >> guest: yes, the best example is the way the internet was built and the way that the web was built. the internet was partially a result of visionary government unnamed, which we've heard a lot about in the early days there is some important funding for the government. for the most part from the internet was built by louis collaborative networks come with that in leaders, without any bureaucrat that people who aren't actually trying to patent their inventions, want working for private corporation a more freely building on each other's ideas that were fighting those ideas sharing them. now, this is one of things where if we had this conversati
might have gone too far and the government should reassert itself in protecting the workers' rights. quayle: the premise of the question is the administration has been lack in enforcement and i disagree with that i tell you why if you want to ask some business people that i talked to periodically, they complain about enforcement of this administration, and furthermore, let me tell you this for the record when we have found violations in this administration, there's not only been tough enforcement, but the most severe penalties, the largest penalties in the history of the department of labor has been led under the violations found. they deserve it and we are committed to carry the the broad question goes to the whole issue of the regulations has a regulation worked on not worked? in my opinion regulation has worked. we've had a deregulated economy and we have produced through the deregulation, the spirit of the entrepreneur ship the individual going out and starting a business. the businessman or woman going out to risk their investments to start a business and hire people. we have p
, and that segues to the discussion about the political opposition. the u.s. government has been trying to talk with the turks. my understanding, and i hope you know more about this than i do that the dsnc really is not an effective organization, and which leads to the fact there suspect anybody for the -- suspect anybody for the u.s. or the syria or the u.n. or really anybody else to talk to about cutting a deal or finding a way out other than continuing bloodshed. can you talk about the political opposition? >> that's a great question as i said in the talk. the only absentee is the great debating society. the national congress, the opposition group created in the aftermath of the revolution. these guys have no support on the ground. people don't know them. their names and faces, inside the country, and they think we don't care. they are not in the country. they distributed aid, and they are quiet, but they are not anywhere close to the front lines, not gaining what they need, there's a lot of fighting, and a lot resigned. the islamists are taking over, certain facts are supported, you know, q
not committees of government. he's dealing with the canadian government. we are asking them for carte blanche for the passport. can you imagine the canadian government coming to the united states congress and asking us for blank passports? domeback. he's dealing with every level from the white house, jimmy carter, who actually approved, tony had one foot out the door in germany and a cable came into his head stop, president is reviewing. 20 minutes later, godspeed, good luck, from the president of the united states. this is unprecedented. because as he said, if this didn't a wealthy american flag was going to be draped all over it. so he's working with the canadians, working wit with a we us, working with the cia bureaucracy, and is working with the state department. and it's difficult to get everybody on the same page with the idea that they are calling the best bad idea they could come up with. he did all that. but beyond that he went and walked them through the airport on his own, which wasn't necessarily in the plan, and our headquarters often tells us don't do that. don't go in the airpo
to as we think about setting up the rules for the auction. >> host: what about looking at government-held spectrum as well? >> guest: that's another piece of the puzzle that i talked about repeatedly since i got to the fcc. it's a critical part to the extent that the federal goth by some -- federal government by some estimate krolls approximately 40% of the magnetic spectrum, and i think we need to think creatively about ways to facilitate the clearing and reallocation of spectrum in cases where it's not being used as efficiently. and to the extent that's not possible, i'm not opposed to innovative sharing strategies. >> host: do you think there's a better solution? do you -- is there a better solution than the spectrum auction to get spectrum out in the marketplace? >> guest: well, as i outlined in pittsburgh, i take an all of the above approach, so while the television broadcast spectrum is one critical part of the puzzle that, you know, could work to the benefit of consumers, it's not the only one. there are other bands that i've talked about where the commission could take action
a check, antar government building, rent a video. he can hardly do anything. instead the critics rather than try to help people get ideas simply yell racism further exacerbating the racial political tensions. chris dodd who crafted a bipartisan lecturer -- reform bill after the florida miltown was quoted as saying the goal of american law should be to make it easy to vote and hard to achieve. we are americans. we can do both. to civil rights. one is the right to never be prevented or intimidated from voting. we had a history in many states. poll tax, literacy test, bizarre registration hours. we passed the civil rights law to prevent that. the second city right not to have your vote canceled up by someone who is an illegal alien, and died, voting twice, or someone who does not even exist. that to file its your sole rights. we can do both. now, an obstacle to this is to reference the previous speaker on fast and furious, the eric holder justice department. they claim there is no voter fraud america. the clinical want to poll taxes. eric holder himself said that. they are suing any state
a lot of these people into government. that was a good or bad thing. many people saw it as a sign of academics and maybe even take the country in a different direction. so i contacted the minister of higher education and the contacted bashar. two years almost to the day later the ambassador to the united states called me up and was also a friend and also an academic. dean of computer science at damascus university prior to becoming ambassador. he said, it's on. and i had forgotten about this whole thing. and i said, what's on? and the set to well, the president wants to meet with you and so common with him in may and june of that year extensively, it's viewed his wife and many other syrian officials. >> what was the first meeting like? >> well, after the pleasantries in after i explained why i wanted to do this my first substantive sentence to him was, mr. president, you know i'm not an apologist for syria. of writing this book on you, and of going to criticize you. and he said, that's fine. i know you will criticize me. i know that because i'm not perfect and in the past you crit
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